Fool for France

entry

So, this is my entry hall, where you will go into the living room. Someone said she’d like heated floors. The contractors replied, “We love doing those,” and got to it. At the moment the living room has no floor at all. When the shutters are open, you look from the floor of the basement right to the ceiling. In this photo of course you just see a dark spot that eats money. The finish floor of the entry is long gone, along with about a foot of subfloor. On the wall, out of range of the camera, is a construction detail; paper is so easy to lose, after all. The detail shows layers and layers of waterproofing, insulation, heating coils, concrete subfloor and, finally, the finish floor. When the guys are done, expect to see pretty limestone tiles with little black cabuchon insets. Once the finish trim is in and the walls are painted, the entry should look very 19th century, as if we did nothing. However even on the coldest day, you will feel nice and toasty warm.

Speaking of dark spots that eat money, we drilled a hole behind the house, the better to estimate the amount of water available for the geothermal system. It turns out that there is plenty of water, much more than we need, even now, in the dryest part of the year. This means we can go ahead with the geothermal refurbishment — we don’t have to build one from scratch. At last we have identified a way to save some money.

3 Replies to “More Stashed Cash”

    1. Yes, it will be cheap to run. The payback compared to electric radiators is about three years. Nobody runs a whole house on electric radiators, though. The more usual point of comparison is what, fuel oil? It freaks me out to even think about having a big tank of flammable fuel in my basement. I think the payback period on that is about 8 years. Geothermal heat even compares favorably to pellets, though I forget the payback period on that. They told me. Between the payback period, the unsightly pellet silo out in the back garden and the sheer hassle of waiting around for that annual delivery — it’s France, they never show up when you’re home — the geothermal would have been a no-brainer, even if I hadn’t had the legacy system to tap into.

      The second option would have been an air compressor or the pellets. I think they were nudging me towards pellets as a fallback.

      The downside is the high initial cost. If you can handle that, it definitely pays off down the road.

      Like

Comments are closed.

La Nostalgie

Des textiles vintage et des trésors intemporels de la vie à la campagne

Prosecco Trail

Welcome to a space about sparkling wine, winemakers and lost empires along the trails of the Alps and Adriatic Sea.

My Plant Babies

"Botany is the art of insulting flowers in Greek and Latin." -Alphonse Karr

Piper Dog

This site is the dog’s pajamas because that's what this tagline says.

the quiet photographer

un fotografo tranquillo, semplicemente

London Wlogger

Walking blogger exploring London's hidden gems, parks, rivers, bridges, landmarks and history!

Taste of France

The beautiful life in the other South of France

Frelon Cottage

Our French House Renovation

Our French Oasis

FAMILY LIFE IN A FRENCH COUNTRY VILLAGE

Maison Travers

Living & Cooking in the Dordogne

Half Baked In Paradise

Searching, settling, sauteeing and spritzing

The Venomous Bead

Adapting to difference, staying the same person...either side of the Channel and now the Atlantic

Colin Bisset

writer, traveller, broadcaster

Poshbird with Passion

restoring and saving 'stuff'

Fork and Pixel

Adventures in food and photography

catterel

A Cat's Eye View

Multifarious meanderings

The odds and sods of everyday life.

Brat Like Me

Curtis Family Farming Grass-fed Beef in Southwest France

David Lebovitz

Or fool in France? Depends on the day...

grasspunk

Grass-fed, Pastured Meat in Southwest France

Food, Photography & France

Journal of a food photographer living in France

%d bloggers like this: